A Black Student Kimberly Wimberly barred from being Valedictorian Files Suit


A recent high school graduate from Arkansas is suing her school district, claiming it refused to recognize her as the school’s sole valedictorian because she is black.

Kymberly Wimberly, 18, earned the highest grade point average in McGehee Secondary School’s 2011 graduating class. She did so as a young mother, according to the complaint she submitted to the U.S. District Court for Arkansas’ Eastern District. She was named the school’s valedictorian and then later given co-valedictorian status with a white student who had lower grades, her complaint says.

Kymberly Wimberly

No legal response has been filed by lawyers for the school district or any other school or district representatives, according to court officials. Superintendent Thomas Gathen said he has yet to be served with any sort of court documents. Because of this, Gathen said he was unable to comment on several individual issues brought up in Wimberly’s complaint.

“The issue that someone’s trying to paint is that this was a racially motivated,” Gathen told CNN. “That wasn’t an issue with (the co-valedictorians). This is strictly an academic issue and a policy issue, not a racial issue.”

Wimberly is seeking punitive damages of $75,000 and recognition as the sole valedictorian of her class. Wimberly’s complaint also argues the McGehee school district, in southeastern Arkansas not too far from the Mississippi River, habitually withheld access to challenging classes from black students.

Wimberly said students were told at a schoolwide assembly that advance placement classes were very rigorous and that only those who really thought they would thrive with intense workloads should elect to take them. Then, individual students were taken aside and told that the classes really weren’t all that bad, she told CNN. The overwhelming majority of those students were white, she said, adding that she was the only black student in her AP literature class and one of two in calculus.

“Black students are meant to stay in regular course levels and mostly play sports,” Wimberly said. “That’s what were good at that that’s what we should stick to – that’s the mentality of McGehee.”

Wimberly said she had one teacher, for AP biology, who encouraged all students to take the class. Its racial makeup was half black, half white, and was more reflective of McGehee’s student population, which is 46%  black.

The case has been gaining increasing attention since Courthouse News Service reported on it Monday.

According to the complaint, Wimberly’s mother, Molly Bratton, works as the McGehee district’s media specialist. On May 10, Bratton learned from the school’s counselor that her daughter had earned the top grade point average in her class. After sharing the exciting news with her daughter, she overheard someone in the school’s copy room saying the accolade would cause “a big mess,” according to the complaint.

Later that day, the complaint says, Bratton confirmed her daughter’s status with Superintendent Gathen.

Then things began to unravel, according to Wimberly.

The next day, the school’s principal, Darrell Thompson, told Bratton that he had decided to appoint another student, who was white, as a co-valedictorian. CNN was unable to reach Thompson for comment.

The complaint says Thompson attributed the decision to something in the student handbook, though the complaint says he did not list a specific policy.

In regards to recognition of a valedictorian, the McGehee handbook says  that “students must be continuously enrolled at McGehee High School the last two semesters without transferring during this time to be considered in class ranking or eligible for valedictorian or salutatorian status.”

The handbook says students will be given the same class rank only if their grades are the same, but in deciding class rank, students with lower GPAs who are taking more or harder classes will not be penalized. Gathen said the Wimberly’s co-valedictorian had half a credit more than Wimberly and the difference in the students’ GPAs was .03 or .05. Gathen said the outcome would have been the same were the situations reversed.

“I would have made the same decision,” he said. “I was the one who made the ultimate decision.”

Wimberly said she knew of students sharing the valedictorian position in the past, but only if their GPAs were the same, “down to the very last decimal point.”

When she found out that her daughter would have a co-valedictorian, Bratton called Gathen, who told her he had OK’d Thompson’s decision, court documents state. The school’s counselor had already sent out a news release to the local community about Wimberly’s achievement, but the school then sent out an additional one about the co-valedictorian.

Bratton sought to bring up the issue at a school board meeting but was told by Gathen that it would have to wait for a meeting after the school’s graduation ceremony because of an error in the form she filled out, according to the documents.

In addition to these details of the case, the complaint also claims that the district places more emphasis on challenging its white students than its black ones.

“African-American students were not encouraged to take Honors or Advanced Placement classes,” the complaint says. “Caucasian students had to almost opt out (of advanced classes).”

Wimberly said she was lucky in that she had parents who would support her academic pursuits, even if many of her teachers would not.

“(Other students’) parents aren’t as active as mine,” Wimberly said. “Think about children who don’t have parents who are active in the school.”

 

http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2011/07/26/valedictorian-sues-school-was-she-snubbed-because-of-race/


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